• Tony Auth’s depiction of Herblock taking on presidents of all stripes;
  • Alexander Calder’s Cold War-era artwork supporting the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy in 1975;
  • David Seymour’s 1937 photograph of Picasso with a glimpse of the painting “Guernica,” showing the terror of war in a famous example of protest art — and Herblock’s 1973 tribute to Picasso’s impact;
  • Kerry James Marshall’s somber tribute to civil rights champions Martin Luther King Jr. and President John F. Kennedy in 1997;
  • Herblock’s “Reminder, 1942,” declaring his deep appreciation for those serving in the U.S. armed forces during World War II;
  • California artist Juan Fuentes’ insight into the role of artist as social commentator in 2013;
  • Ruth Lynne McIntosh’s portrait created as part of the Combat Paper Project for veterans to produce art with paper made of old uniforms;
  • Lebanese-American artist Helen Zughaib’s memorialization of Syrian refugees.

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I write on national and international Health, Politics, Business, Education, Environment, Biodiversity, Science, First Nations, Humanitarian, gender, women

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Asha Bajaj

Asha Bajaj

I write on national and international Health, Politics, Business, Education, Environment, Biodiversity, Science, First Nations, Humanitarian, gender, women

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