The earliest adorned female infant burial in an Italian cave helps in revealing the evolution of personhood in Europe

Arizona (US): An infant girl, adorned with a rich selection of treasured beads and pendants was buried in an Italian cave by a group of hunter-gatherers nearly ten thousand years ago, just after the last Ice Age, https://phys.org/news/2021 reports said.

Asha Bajaj

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To signal their grief, hunter-gatherers put an eagle-owl talon on the infant’s body and nicknamed her as showing that even the youngest females were recognized as full persons in their society.

An analysis of the ornaments, which includes over 60 pierced shell beads and four shell pendants, was done by Claudine Gravel-Miguel, a postdoctoral researcher with the Institute of Human Origins at Arizona State University (ASU) and coauthor was published this week in Nature Scientific Reports and offers insight into the early Mesolithic period, from which few recorded burials are known.

“The evolution and development of how early humans buried their dead as revealed in the archaeological record have enormous cultural significance,” says Jamie Hodgkins, ASU doctoral graduate, and…

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Asha Bajaj

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